Kitchen Storage

Zone 2 - Consumables

This kitchen storage zone helps you think and visualise where and how to store your food items. This zone can be a little trickier than others and is often found in more than one area. For example, you may want to house a tall fridge freezer, practically having a large drawered or a pull out larder with all of your dry foods and tins would keep these items together, but is not always suitable. This may be down to a concern of making the room feel too small with towering unit blocks, a lack of work surface, or simply wanting these items nearer the preparation or cooking zones. The videos below will help you work through the possibilities.

Food storage.jpgWe are always on the look out for people to carry out market research. If you are looking for a new kitchen and would like to be a part of the process please get in touch.

The first consideration in this zone is for the types of items that are kept in this zone; some are obvious while others are not. Below is a list of items that you may wish to consider.

 

  • Bread
  • Breakfast cereals
  • Tea, coffee and cocoa
  • Un-chilled drinks
  • Pastas, rice and side dishes
  • Jar and tin foods
  • Snacks and sweets
  • Baby foods
  • Specialist foods and ingredients

Once you have decided on the items that need to be kept within this zone you are then able to decide on the best way to store them, and where in the room is best to situate them.

The best way to do this is to break it down into further sections allowing you to consider the space that is required for each section.

To break this down think about the difference in storage space with wider and deeper units versus shallow and narrow storage units. For larger items you may be able to gain over 18% more storage, but for other items you may also lose the equivalent.

Mixture of deep drawers

To get the best possible use for your Consumables zone you should think about the foods that you and your family prepare and eat. There is no need to include excessive space for tins, jars, spices, flour, pastas etc if you tend to eat fresh or frozen foods. This space could be more suitable for a larger fridge or freezer space. Also if you are a household of 1 or 2 people do you need to store as much as a family of 4 or 5 people? Likewise if you enjoy cooking everything from scratch, do you want to keep some items with your mixing bowls and food blenders? Do you tend to bulk buy cereal or rice? Or for the keen baker maybe you require a 6th zone – the baking zone. The possibilities are endless! Luckily with a little thought and good design preparation we can over come all of these obstacles creating the ideal work flow in your space.

Items to consider in this zone;Larder consumable.jpg

  • Bread
  • Breakfast cereals
  • Tea, coffee and cocoa
  • Un-chilled drinks
  • Pastas, rice and side dishes
  • Jar and tin foods
  • Snacks and sweets
  • Baby foods
  • Specialist foods and ingredients

All units in this zone will use the space most efficiently as wide units.

Unit 1Corner consumables.jpg

Made up of 2 deep drawers, to store:

  • Bread
  • Breakfast cereals
  • Tea, coffee and cocoa
  • Un-chilled drinks
  • Snacks and sweets
Food storage.jpg

Unit 2

Made up of 2 deep drawers, to store:

  • Jar and tin foods
  • Pastas, rice and side dishes
  • Specialist foods and ingredients (if it is a small quantity)

Unit 3 – Specialist units

Made up of 2 deep drawers:

  • Specialist foods and ingredients (if it is in large quantities)
  • Bulk buying food, often intended to fill small jars in other areas.
  • Baby foods.

This unit will work well near to the non consumable area as it is often used as an amalgamation of the two zones. For example:

  • Bottom deep drawer to hold
  • Large items stored in big packets, such as bulk baby milk, bottles, and even nappies!!!
  • Middle deep drawer
  • To hold jars and tins of baby food and snacks, along with baby and children's bowls and plates.
  • Top shallow drawer to hold
  • Baby / children's cutlery, bibs and wipes